Pak Keung Wan with two cameras at The Gissing Museum
Pak Keung Wan under solar eclipse cloth

performing (Primal Scenes) at The Gissing Museum,

Wakefield

 

Lune (Primal Scenes), digital photographs

 

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I have these thoughts of what it means to give birth to an image, or of images emerging from flesh; how the world may appear in the mind of a being within the womb. 

 

This series of images have arisen by photographing the surface of a ground glass housed within a large format camera. Over time, I have come to see this instrument acting like a surrogate to a body's dark interior, in the rendering of colours and textures as a condition of looking through skin, or bodily fat.

The form of the eclipse found in my other works surfaces again, becoming embodied within the photographer's dark cloth. It envelops and provides a space in which to see a world, one that is upside down, or is that a feotal way up?

The idea of the photograph functioning as a form of maternal writing holds much meaning. Rather than projecting our thoughts out onto the world, I want these images to speak of a sense of return, to an internal space, entering through an orifice-like shutter.

I saw through him

 

Recently, the notion of the transparent body has begun to take hold, and this act of being 'seen through'.

In the figures I inhabit through the performing of Primal Scenes lies this tension and vulnerability to their existence; of being seen too readily or simply not seen at all. Such acts resonate with experiences being lived.

 
 
performing (Primal Scenes) at The Hepworth, Wakefield
 
solar eclipse fabric, velvet construction
Installation: The Art House, Wakefield
digital projection with glassine
(Primal Scenes), 2017
digital projection, glassine
Installation: The Art House, Wakefield, UK
for my solo residency show on why some things form and other things don't
documentary photographs by Jules Lister
 

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